SCIENCE & SOUL — THE GIRO STORY

It’s always been more than just a helmet thing, or a simple bike or snow thing. It’s about the ride. Specifically, your ride. Giro exists to enhance your connection to the ride, and the feelings it brings to life. The sense of freedom and adventure. The desire to win. The joy of living well. From that first day 30 years ago when Jim Gentes opened our doors to the world, we’ve been on a mission to make sure that riding is the best part of a great life. Along the way we’ve learned a great deal, created some notable products, endured some mistakes, pushed ourselves and our competitors to go further, and made friends across continents and generations.

Riding gave us all of this. And led us to you.

Why? Why did a helmet have to be heavy to be considered safe? And why so hot? And as stylish as your grandmother’s couch? Back in 1985, Jim Gentes sat in his California garage and asked those questions because that’s exactly what helmets were like back then.

The status quo, in a word, sucked.

And with that in mind, Gentes created the first, truly modern sports helmet—the Giro Prolight. It was revolutionary. The Prolight breathed well. It seemed to weigh nothing at all. And, this didn’t hurt, it was cool—as much a vehicle for personal expression as a bucket for your brain.

This is where we started—tinkering with the status quo—and we’ve never stopped.
At Giro, we’re not big on heavy-handed, corporate policies. But there is one rule we live by: Never settle for the status quo. Our goal is to design the future… and you don’t get there by simply fiddling around the edges.

We are free thinkers. We are at our best when we are breaking down walls, challenging the impossible and reinventing products.
Innovative—it’s a word that gets tossed around a lot. Perhaps too often. Innovation isn’t a matter of simply injecting some carbon into the mix or adding a dash of unobtanium to your formula. To be truly innovative, a product has to actually make your ride better. That’s no small feat. Our job isn’t to bring new bells and whistles to the world. Our job is to bring new ideas to life that enhance your ride.
Imagine taking the best part of a race—that heart-pounding, razor’s-edge descent—and making that crystalline moment of pure awesome the entire point of the race. Pretty cool, right? Now, add 8,000 feet of climbing, 60 miles of high-sierra gravel, dirt and asphalt roads and a motley peloton of 650 riders on skinny tires more interested in having fun than in ripping off the next guy’s legs. While you’re at it, throw in some stellar music, food, beer and as much post-ride carousing as possible.

We call it Grinduro—and it’s part gravel grinder, part enduro race and part best day of the year.

Working at Giro has its perks. Putting on a ride like this one is one of them.
Mountain biking isn’t a static sport. That sounds obvious, but the reality of it can hit you upside the head sometimes. In fact, it used to do that all the time. Before we invented the Roc Loc® fit system in 1994, mountain bike riders were simply accustomed to their helmets rattling down the trail.

You’d find yourself hurtling through the chunder at Mach Chicken with your helmet bucking around on your head— an annoying, rattling, sweaty, party crasher. As the first fit system to truly allow you to fine tune helmet fit, Roc Loc® tamed the beasts atop our heads. It was a complete game changer.
In 2014 we released our first helmets equipped with MIPS—a design that can reduce the energy transferred to your brain during an angled impact. But here’s an interesting point: we weren’t the first company with a MIPS-equipped helmet. There’s a reason for that—before we adopt any new technology, we thoroughly test it ourselves. If it’s a question of being first or being right, it’s no question at all: We knuckle down and do the science. We test it. We ride it. And then we test it again. And again. When it comes to protecting our friends, we don’t take chances.
The first time you drop down Highway 17 into Santa Cruz, California, is a mindblower of sorts. There’s the mighty Pacific crashing at the town’s feet, the towering redwood trees…. Yep, it’s majestic all right. But that’s not what makes Santa Cruz special. It’s the people.

Santa Cruz attracts a different kind of person—non-conformists, artists, inventors, genre-tweaking types. In short, the very kind of people who create very cool things. This funky little town has birthed more groundbreaking companies than you can shake a stick at. It’s why, frankly, Giro settled here and why we’ve refused to leave the county.

Santa Cruz is more than a “cool” scene: it’s an important part of what makes our products different. Some people might call this confluence of creativity a “perfect incubator for entrepreneurialism.”

We just call it the Santa Cruz Effect.
The design process never ends—that’s not a complaint—it’s what drives us, excites us. There are no high-fives and backslapping fests when we finish the latest project.

We’re not saying that being satisfied is a bad thing, per se… it’s just never been our M.O. We’re always looking forward to the next iteration. Always dreaming of ways to improve what we just created.

Perfection is never a finished product: it’s a moving target.
There’s this sound people make when they put on a bit of kit and everything feels just… right. Their shoulders drop, eyes go a little glassy and out comes this visceral ahhhhh. Our job is to make that moment happen.

The perfect fit isn’t defined by what you feel in a dressing room—it’s how that helmet, glove or shoe feels outside, during that clutch moment when you can’t afford to be distracted by anything that binds, scrapes, overheats or simply pulls you away from that rare golden moment you’ve been chasing.

We are interface innovators—we design products that connect you to your sport in a way that’s so seamless and natural that it’s hard to tell where you stop and we start. Ahhh, indeed.
Science and soul may seem like two completely disparate ideas—even polar opposites—but throughout Giro’s history, we’ve placed equal value on both.

In our headquarters—what we call the Dome—we have more than 50 test fixtures, several 3D printers and our own in-house wind tunnel. We even have a proprietary heat-sensing head form that we call the Therminator that is used to validate vent locations and test cooling power.

But the ride is equally important to any data report or CAD file: it’s how we cut loose, how we connect with our community, what we plan our time around. And pardon us if we get evangelical about the ride, but we believe it’s the ultimate opportunity for physics, aesthetics and emotions to align into one beautiful experience.

Science is lifeless without soul.
We don’t know who invented the cubicle, but it’s fair to say they didn’t mean for humans to actually live in them. We take that seriously. Step through our front door and you’re soon squeezing your way past dozens of clapped-out mountain bikes, high-zoot carbon race bikes and battered snow boards. That’s no accident. We are ride activists. For us, the ride is more than just a daily shot of adrenaline; it is our very foundation—it’s what informs every design, shape and feature on the products that bear our name.
The best helmet is the world is useless if nobody wants to wear it. That realization is what prompted us to develop the Fat Hat back in 1993. Kids, no surprise, won’t wear helmets that they think are uncool. So we set about making a helmet that kids would actually like. It looked like a baseball hat—well, a sort of obese baseball hat—and, no, it didn’t take off.

But was it a failure? Not at all.

We’re not being stubborn here. The Fat Hat may not have achieved instant radness, but it convinced us to keep designing helmets that people didn’t think were lame; and that, in turn, yielded all manner of models, such as the Nine and Bad Lieutenant, which proved successful by any measure.
Not so long ago, the only people wearing helmets on the snow were the people in speed suits, the ones threading the needle between one set of gates and the next. The thing was, most of us weren’t hitting the slopes in spandex suits. We were riding the trees and terrain parks, which meant we probably needed helmets as much as anybody else.

Snowboarders and skiers didn’t have a death wish, they were just saying “No” to helmets that were hot, heavy and thoroughly lame. So we created something truly innovative—something that completely eliminated the kook factor. In `99, we entered the fray with the Nine, the world’s first in-molded snow helmet. Astonishingly light, comfortable and, yes, cool, the Nine was so innovative, it set the stage for every snowsports helmet that followed in its wake.
No one ever achieved greatness by playing it safe. That’s a simple truth. It also means that not everything we’ve tried in the past 30 years has been a “win.” We’re not ashamed to admit it. We don’t regret those moments in our history because our greatest achievements have also all been born from the risks we’ve taken. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

Evolving, pushing boundaries, challenging ourselves…it’s in our DNA. It’s who we are.
So there we were, having a knockdown, drag-out fight. You’ve never seen so many people in an office so torn over a decision, but this mattered. It was 2011 and we were launching the Factor, our first shoe. We were looking at a couple of lasts—the form that would define the shape of our shoe—and there was a millimeter difference in width between the two. Yes, a millimeter.

Okay, maybe that sounds ridiculous, but to us, a millimeter might as well be a mile. We’re obsessive like that, but it’s OCD for the greater good. Did we mention this was the 17th attempt at getting the shape just right? Yeah, obsessive—and at a level that most companies would deem ridiculous. But we won’t apologize for it. Evolving and pushing boundaries is what defines us. It’s in our DNA.

And you know what? Those were seriously comfortable shoes.
Business must amount to something more than the simple selling of “stuff.” That sentiment may not be the cornerstone of the MBA program at Harvard or Wharton, but it is our very foundation. What we do in life should make a positive contribution to the world. When Jim Gentes founded Giro in 1985 that was his vision and it’s still our mission today.

We consider the people we work with, and the people who use our products, friends. Friendship is based on trust and respect. Would you send your friend out onto a trail with a six-foot drop, or tell him to hit a huge kicker, in anything other than the best gear possible? Absolutely not. Everyone is, ultimately, a friend of a friend and they deserve our best. Every product. Every time.

Is this a “text book” business strategy? We, honestly, don’t know. But it is doing the right thing. And that’s what matters.
There’s that moment when people ask you how you earn your living. For whatever reason, it’s always the first thing they want to know after you tell them your name. When we get around to explaining what it is that we do, people are often surprised: How can one company be involved in all those things?

To us, the common thread has always been crystal clear: We enhance the ride.

It doesn’t matter whether you are talking to skiers or roadies or mountain bikers, they always use the same words to describe what they love about the ride: freedom, adventure, community…

We build the products that aid and abet that next adventure, be it a 30-minute commute through a sea of yellow cabs in Manhattan, or a first descent down a lonely peak in Norway. Those two things may look entirely different, but inside of us, they feel the same and we do them for the same reasons. It’s the desire to escape. To move. To push ourselves. To lead a life that, plainly put, doesn’t suck.
“I want to create products that make a difference to people, products that cause people to be really happy that Giro exists. Design of great products that are successful in the market and change the face of the industry is the ultimate reason this company exists.”

Giro Sport Design Timeline

  • 1985

    The Logo

    Jim Gentes, establishes his brand with a focus on design solutions, that enhance experience & performance. The logo he sketches “tour or circuit” embodies the ultimate feeling on a bike.

  • 1985

    Advantage

    The Advantage™ helmet was designed to help riders cheat the howling winds in the new sport of triathlon, where equipment was becoming re-imagined through science.

  • 1986

    Prolight

    Jim takes a prototype of a lightweight, high-performance helmet to the Long Beach bike show and comes back with $100,000 in orders.

  • 1989

    Aerohead

    The Tour de France changes forever when a young American pioneers new aerodynamic equipment (including his Aerohead™ helmet) to win the three week race by eight seconds.

  • 1990

    Air Attack

    The Air Attack™ gets a surf-inspired fiberglass reinforcement to help manage impacts. Proof that Santa Cruz is the place for Giro to be.

  • 1992

    Bottle Rocket

    We create a modular water bottle with a wide mouth screw top opening. The "pop-top" water bottle, an icon in cycling for many decades is obsoleted by Giro's Bottle Rocket Design.

  • 1994

    Roc Loc

    Roc Loc® greatly improves a helmet's stability when riding over roots and rocks. Jokes about jock straps ensue, but soon every helmet has one.

  • 1998

    Switchblade

    Long-travel bikes herald a new era in mountain biking, and we create the first modular full-face helmet to meet freeriders' needs.

  • 1999

    Nine

    Giro creates a light-weight snow helmet with vents. Skeptics laugh, but riders embrace it and helmets become a normal sight on the mountains in winter.

  • 2003

    Xen

    The Xen™ mashes-up an XC helmet, a skate helmet and a dash of moto-style. The result is a helmet that establishes the "trail riding" category in helmets.

  • 2004

    Snow Goggles

    Shortly after entering the goggle category, we introduce the first mainstream goggle to offer a lens-interchange system — the Manifest™

  • 2008

    Cycling Gloves

    Giro designs a line of gloves that incorporate an unconventional, tailored "multi-panel" construction to enhance fit and feel when gripping the bar.

  • 2010

    Footwear

    Giro debuts cycling shoes that stand out for their fit, comfort and adaptability. Many riders remark that turning the pedals now feels better than ever.

  • 2012

    Air Attack

    Bike design is changing with aerodynamic influence. We reinvent the Air Attack, a connonball to the broadside of conventional thinking. Olympic gold follows.

  • 2013

    Apparel

    Why not design cycling apparel for the freedom of outdoor adventure instead of anaerobic thresholds? Riders now have a choice in how to dress.

  • 2014

    MIPS

    New materials, flexible outer shells and MIPS technology are reducing impact for riders and the planet. Helmets truly are better than ever.

  • 2016

    Avance MIPS

    Giro introduces the ultimate helmet for world cup downhill ski racers, with a mix of advanced materials and a new design that redirects energy called MIPS Spherical.

  • This changes everything

    Why? Why did a helmet have to be heavy to be considered safe? And why so hot? And as stylish as your grandmother’s couch? Back in 1985, Jim Gentes sat in his California garage and asked those questions because that’s exactly what helmets were like back then.

    The status quo, in a word, sucked.

    And with that in mind, Gentes created the first, truly modern sports helmet—the Giro Prolight. It was revolutionary. The Prolight breathed well. It seemed to weigh nothing at all. And, this didn’t hurt, it was cool—as much a vehicle for personal expression as a bucket for your brain.

    This is where we started—tinkering with the status quo—and we’ve never stopped.
  • Challenge the status quo

    At Giro, we’re not big on heavy-handed, corporate policies. But there is one rule we live by: Never settle for the status quo. Our goal is to design the future… and you don’t get there by simply fiddling around the edges.

    We are free thinkers. We are at our best when we are breaking down walls, challenging the impossible and reinventing products.
  • More than Bells & Whistles

    Innovative—it’s a word that gets tossed around a lot. Perhaps too often. Innovation isn’t a matter of simply injecting some carbon into the mix or adding a dash of unobtanium to your formula. To be truly innovative, a product has to actually make your ride better. That’s no small feat. Our job isn’t to bring new bells and whistles to the world. Our job is to bring new ideas to life that enhance your ride.
  • A New kind of bike race

    Imagine taking the best part of a race—that heart-pounding, razor’s-edge descent—and making that crystalline moment of pure awesome the entire point of the race. Pretty cool, right? Now, add 8,000 feet of climbing, 60 miles of high-sierra gravel, dirt and asphalt roads and a motley peloton of 650 riders on skinny tires more interested in having fun than in ripping off the next guy’s legs. While you’re at it, throw in some stellar music, food, beer and as much post-ride carousing as possible.

    We call it Grinduro—and it’s part gravel grinder, part enduro race and part best day of the year.

    Working at Giro has its perks. Putting on a ride like this one is one of them.
  • The Introduction of ROC LOC

    Mountain biking isn’t a static sport. That sounds obvious, but the reality of it can hit you upside the head sometimes. In fact, it used to do that all the time. Before we invented the Roc Loc® fit system in 1994, mountain bike riders were simply accustomed to their helmets rattling down the trail.

    You’d find yourself hurtling through the chunder at Mach Chicken with your helmet bucking around on your head— an annoying, rattling, sweaty, party crasher. As the first fit system to truly allow you to fine tune helmet fit, Roc Loc® tamed the beasts atop our heads. It was a complete game changer.
  • Redirecting Energy

    In 2014 we released our first helmets equipped with MIPS—a design that can reduce the energy transferred to your brain during an angled impact. But here’s an interesting point: we weren’t the first company with a MIPS-equipped helmet. There’s a reason for that—before we adopt any new technology, we thoroughly test it ourselves. If it’s a question of being first or being right, it’s no question at all: We knuckle down and do the science. We test it. We ride it. And then we test it again. And again. When it comes to protecting our friends, we don’t take chances.
  • The Santa Cruz Effect

    The first time you drop down Highway 17 into Santa Cruz, California, is a mindblower of sorts. There’s the mighty Pacific crashing at the town’s feet, the towering redwood trees…. Yep, it’s majestic all right. But that’s not what makes Santa Cruz special. It’s the people.

    Santa Cruz attracts a different kind of person—non-conformists, artists, inventors, genre-tweaking types. In short, the very kind of people who create very cool things. This funky little town has birthed more groundbreaking companies than you can shake a stick at. It’s why, frankly, Giro settled here and why we’ve refused to leave the county.

    Santa Cruz is more than a “cool” scene: it’s an important part of what makes our products different. Some people might call this confluence of creativity a “perfect incubator for entrepreneurialism.”

    We just call it the Santa Cruz Effect.
  • Perfection is a moving target

    The design process never ends—that’s not a complaint—it’s what drives us, excites us. There are no high-fives and backslapping fests when we finish the latest project.

    We’re not saying that being satisfied is a bad thing, per se… it’s just never been our M.O. We’re always looking forward to the next iteration. Always dreaming of ways to improve what we just created.

    Perfection is never a finished product: it’s a moving target.
  • The Science of AHHHH...

    There’s this sound people make when they put on a bit of kit and everything feels just… right. Their shoulders drop, eyes go a little glassy and out comes this visceral ahhhhh. Our job is to make that moment happen.

    The perfect fit isn’t defined by what you feel in a dressing room—it’s how that helmet, glove or shoe feels outside, during that clutch moment when you can’t afford to be distracted by anything that binds, scrapes, overheats or simply pulls you away from that rare golden moment you’ve been chasing.

    We are interface innovators—we design products that connect you to your sport in a way that’s so seamless and natural that it’s hard to tell where you stop and we start. Ahhh, indeed.
  • Science VS. Soul?

    Science and soul may seem like two completely disparate ideas—even polar opposites—but throughout Giro’s history, we’ve placed equal value on both.

    In our headquarters—what we call the Dome—we have more than 50 test fixtures, several 3D printers and our own in-house wind tunnel. We even have a proprietary heat-sensing head form that we call the Therminator that is used to validate vent locations and test cooling power.

    But the ride is equally important to any data report or CAD file: it’s how we cut loose, how we connect with our community, what we plan our time around. And pardon us if we get evangelical about the ride, but we believe it’s the ultimate opportunity for physics, aesthetics and emotions to align into one beautiful experience.

    Science is lifeless without soul.
  • Life is bigger than your cubicle

    We don’t know who invented the cubicle, but it’s fair to say they didn’t mean for humans to actually live in them. We take that seriously. Step through our front door and you’re soon squeezing your way past dozens of clapped-out mountain bikes, high-zoot carbon race bikes and battered snow boards. That’s no accident. We are ride activists. For us, the ride is more than just a daily shot of adrenaline; it is our very foundation—it’s what informs every design, shape and feature on the products that bear our name.
  • Lesson Learned: The Fat Hat

    The best helmet is the world is useless if nobody wants to wear it. That realization is what prompted us to develop the Fat Hat back in 1993. Kids, no surprise, won’t wear helmets that they think are uncool. So we set about making a helmet that kids would actually like. It looked like a baseball hat—well, a sort of obese baseball hat—and, no, it didn’t take off.

    But was it a failure? Not at all.

    We’re not being stubborn here. The Fat Hat may not have achieved instant radness, but it convinced us to keep designing helmets that people didn’t think were lame; and that, in turn, yielded all manner of models, such as the Nine and Bad Lieutenant, which proved successful by any measure.
  • The First cool snow helmet: NINE

    Not so long ago, the only people wearing helmets on the snow were the people in speed suits, the ones threading the needle between one set of gates and the next. The thing was, most of us weren’t hitting the slopes in spandex suits. We were riding the trees and terrain parks, which meant we probably needed helmets as much as anybody else.

    Snowboarders and skiers didn’t have a death wish, they were just saying “No” to helmets that were hot, heavy and thoroughly lame. So we created something truly innovative—something that completely eliminated the kook factor. In `99, we entered the fray with the Nine, the world’s first in-molded snow helmet. Astonishingly light, comfortable and, yes, cool, the Nine was so innovative, it set the stage for every snowsports helmet that followed in its wake.
  • You can't win if you don't attack

    No one ever achieved greatness by playing it safe. That’s a simple truth. It also means that not everything we’ve tried in the past 30 years has been a “win.” We’re not ashamed to admit it. We don’t regret those moments in our history because our greatest achievements have also all been born from the risks we’ve taken. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

    Evolving, pushing boundaries, challenging ourselves…it’s in our DNA. It’s who we are.
  • Redirecting energy

    So there we were, having a knockdown, drag-out fight. You’ve never seen so many people in an office so torn over a decision, but this mattered. It was 2011 and we were launching the Factor, our first shoe. We were looking at a couple of lasts—the form that would define the shape of our shoe—and there was a millimeter difference in width between the two. Yes, a millimeter.

    Okay, maybe that sounds ridiculous, but to us, a millimeter might as well be a mile. We’re obsessive like that, but it’s OCD for the greater good. Did we mention this was the 17th attempt at getting the shape just right? Yeah, obsessive—and at a level that most companies would deem ridiculous. But we won’t apologize for it. Evolving and pushing boundaries is what defines us. It’s in our DNA.

    And you know what? Those were seriously comfortable shoes.
  • FRIEND OF A FRIEND

    Business must amount to something more than the simple selling of “stuff.” That sentiment may not be the cornerstone of the MBA program at Harvard or Wharton, but it is our very foundation. What we do in life should make a positive contribution to the world. When Jim Gentes founded Giro in 1985 that was his vision and it’s still our mission today.

    We consider the people we work with, and the people who use our products, friends. Friendship is based on trust and respect. Would you send your friend out onto a trail with a six-foot drop, or tell him to hit a huge kicker, in anything other than the best gear possible? Absolutely not. Everyone is, ultimately, a friend of a friend and they deserve our best. Every product. Every time.

    Is this a “text book” business strategy? We, honestly, don’t know. But it is doing the right thing. And that’s what matters.
  • IT’S ALWAYS BEEN THE ADVENTURE

    There’s that moment when people ask you how you earn your living. For whatever reason, it’s always the first thing they want to know after you tell them your name. When we get around to explaining what it is that we do, people are often surprised: How can one company be involved in all those things?

    To us, the common thread has always been crystal clear: We enhance the ride.

    It doesn’t matter whether you are talking to skiers or roadies or mountain bikers, they always use the same words to describe what they love about the ride: freedom, adventure, community…

    We build the products that aid and abet that next adventure, be it a 30-minute commute through a sea of yellow cabs in Manhattan, or a first descent down a lonely peak in Norway. Those two things may look entirely different, but inside of us, they feel the same and we do them for the same reasons. It’s the desire to escape. To move. To push ourselves. To lead a life that, plainly put, doesn’t suck.
  • JIM GENTES - May 1987

    “I want to create products that make a difference to people, products that cause people to be really happy that Giro exists. Design of great products that are successful in the market and change the face of the industry is the ultimate reason this company exists.”

Giro Sport Design Timeline

  • 1985

    The Logo

    Jim Gentes, establishes his brand with a focus on design solutions, that enhance experience & performance. The logo he sketches “tour or circuit” embodies the ultimate feeling on a bike.

  • 1985

    Advantage

    The Advantage™ helmet was designed to help riders cheat the howling winds in the new sport of triathlon, where equipment was becoming re-imagined through science.

  • 1986

    Prolight

    Jim takes a prototype of a lightweight, high-performance helmet to the Long Beach bike show and comes back with $100,000 in orders.

  • 1989

    Aerohead

    The Tour de France changes forever when a young American pioneers new aerodynamic equipment (including his Aerohead™ helmet) to win the three week race by eight seconds.

  • 1990

    Air Attack

    The Air Attack™ gets a surf-inspired fiberglass reinforcement to help manage impacts. Proof that Santa Cruz is the place for Giro to be.

  • 1992

    Bottle Rocket

    We create a modular water bottle with a wide mouth screw top opening. The "pop-top" water bottle, an icon in cycling for many decades is obsoleted by Giro's Bottle Rocket Design.

  • 1994

    Roc Loc

    Roc Loc® greatly improves a helmet's stability when riding over roots and rocks. Jokes about jock straps ensue, but soon every helmet has one.

  • 1998

    Switchblade

    Long-travel bikes herald a new era in mountain biking, and we create the first modular full-face helmet to meet freeriders' needs.

  • 1999

    Nine

    Giro creates a light-weight snow helmet with vents. Skeptics laugh, but riders embrace it and helmets become a normal sight on the mountains in winter.

  • 2003

    Xen

    The Xen™ mashes-up an XC helmet, a skate helmet and a dash of moto-style. The result is a helmet that establishes the "trail riding" category in helmets.

  • 2004

    Snow Goggles

    Shortly after entering the goggle category, we introduce the first mainstream goggle to offer a lens-interchange system — the Manifes™

  • 2008

    Cycling Gloves

    Giro designs a line of gloves that incorporate an unconventional, tailored "multi-panel" construction to enhance fit and feel when gripping the bar.

  • 2010

    Footwear

    Giro debuts cycling shoes that stand out for their fit, comfort and adaptability. Many riders remark that turning the pedals now feels better than ever.

  • 2012

    Air Attack

    Bike design is changing with aerodynamic influence. We reinvent the Air Attack, a connonball to the broadside of conventional thinking. Olympic gold follows.

  • 2013

    Apparel

    Why not design cycling apparel for the freedom of outdoor adventure instead of anaerobic thresholds? Riders now have a choice in how to dress.

  • 2014

    MIPS

    New materials, flexible outer shells and MIPS technology are reducing impact for riders and the planet. Helmets truly are better than ever.

  • 2016

    AVANCE MIPS

    Giro introduces the ultimate helmet for world cup downhill ski racers, with a mix of advanced materials and a new design that redirects energy called MIPS Spherical.